Showing 1–16 of 109 results

African Daisy (Dimorphotheca sp.)

An annual with large orange, salmon or white flowers that are 2 inches wide and blooms in 53 days. Naturalized in the U.S. Best in full sun, dry soils; an excellent cutflower but will close at night, drought-tolerant.

Alkali Sacaton (Sporobolus airoides)

A tough perennial, warm season, native growing in large bunches 24″ to 42″ tall. It grows on dry to moist sites with sand or gravelly soil. This species is used for good forage or grazing grass in lowland and in alkali regions. Alkali Sacaton’s abundant herbage is eaten by cattle, sheep, and horses. It ranges from South Dakota to Washington, south to Missouri, Kansas, Texas, and Mexico.

Alkaligrass (Puccinellia sp.)

A perennial, cool season, native bunchgrass standing 12 to 18” tall. It grows on a wide range of soils and can tolerate high amounts of salinity. This species is an excellent choice in reclamation, roadside stabilization or on saline sites requiring turf. Alkaligrass ranges from New Mexico to Canada and throughout the west.

Varieties:
Fults II

 

 

Alpine Bluegrass (Poa alpina)

A perennial, cold tolerant, native bunchgrass that grows 8 to 24” tall. Grows well in cooler alpine, subalpine zones and mountain meadows. Prefers open sites and well-drained soils. Utilized for erosion control, reclamation and restoration. Occurs in Colorado, Utah, Washington and Oregon.

Annual Gaillardia (Gaillardia pulchella)

Synonyms: Firewheel | Indian Blanket
An annual with leafy plants that bear daisy-like flowers, to 3 inches across, red tipped with yellow or entirely yellow or red. State flower of Oklahoma. Found across coastal Virginia to Florida, west to New Mexico, north to Colorado, Nebraska and Missouri on open, loose or sandy soil; prairies, fields and woodland openings. Best in full sun, well-drained soils.

Annual Sunflower (Helianthus annuus)

Synonyms: Common Sunflower
A robust annual that produces cheery yellow flowers, 2-4 inches across with purplish-brown centers. Has allelopathic properties. Distributed throughout U.S., southern Canada and northern Mexico; abundant in roadsides, waste places and other open sites. Best in full sun, dry
soils; highly adaptable, produces seeds that attracts seed-eaters.

Arizona Cottontop (Digitaria californica)

A perennial, warm season, native bunchgrass that grows 12 to 24” tall. It is a green to bluish-green in color and has adapted to a variety of soils from clay loam to sandy loam as well as loose gravelly soils. Primarily used for in revegetation of eroded rangelands, retired croplands, and to provide forage for wildlife and livestock. Common in the Southwest, from southern Colorado to Texas, Arizona, and northern Mexico.

Arizona Fescue (Festuca arizonica)

A long-lived, perennial, cool season native grass that is densely tufted and bunching,  growing 12 to 36” tall. Found on shallow clay loam to loam and sandy to gravely soils. A heavy root system is an excellent soil binder. Suited for revegetating and stabilizing disturbed soils, road, ski slopes and construction in the mountains. Moderately palatable, can be used for forage and range land restoration. Native to the ponderosa pine zone from Colorado to south to west Texas, Mexico and Nevada.

Arrowleaf Balsomroot (Balsamorhiza sagittata)

Synonyms: Oregon Sunflower | Breadroot
A long-lived, tap-rooted perennial with large, bright yellow flowers are on individual stems but may be numerous, sunflower-like; blooms May to June. Found across B.C. to CA east of the Cascades, east to Alberta, ND, SD and CO, south to northern AZ on open hillsides and flats, fairly deep soil, valleys and foothills up to 9000 ft. elevation, typically with big sagebrush. Best in full sun, dry, well-drained, gravelly soils.

Arroyo Lupine (Lupinus succulentus)

Synonyms: Succulent Lupine
An annual that has succulent stems and palmately compound leaves; the bluish to purple flowers have a yellow dot on the banner. Found in western CA, northern Baja peninsula; abundant along roadsides and disturbed areas, establishes quickly in native coastal scrub areas that have burned. Best in full sun, dry soils, drought tolerant; attracts hummingbirds.

Basket-of-Gold (Aurinia saxatilis)

Synonyms: Goldentuft | Madwort |
Gold-dust | Aurinia saxatilis
A mat-forming perennial with woody roots and bright yellow flowers in clusters; blooms from mid-April to early June. Found on rocky, stony slopes, ledges, and cliffs, usually on limestone. Plants form large, spreading mounds, excellent for the front of borders and rock gardens.
Performs best in lean, very well-drained soil, full sun.

Bearberry (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi)

Trailing evergreen that is a great option for groundcover; prefers full sun and dry to moist soils. Small white flowers bloom in the spring followed by red berries that may persist until winter. Bearberry attracts bees, butterflies, hummingbirds and is palatable to wildlife.

Beardless Bluebunch Wheatgrass (Pseudoroegneria spicata ssp. inermis)

Beadless Bluebunch wheatgrass is a perennial, cool season, native, erect bunchgrass, 12 to 30” tall, often with short rhizomes. It has a wide spectrum of adaptations. It is found on all aspects on mountain slopes, benches, basins, or alluvial fans, and in valley bottoms. Adapted to a wide variety of soils, but is found mostly in well- drained, medium to coarse textures soils which vary in depth from shallow to very deep.

Beardless Wildrye (Leymus triticoides)

Beardless Wildrye is a perennial, cool season, native sod-forming grass. It is typically at least 20” tall with strong rhizomes. This grass grows on mostly heavy soils in riparian areas, bottomlands, valleys, foothills, mountain flats and meadows from coastal marshes to high elevations. Beardless Wildrye is used for soil stabilization on channel, stream and river slopes and restoration of roadside, riparian and rangeland areas. It is also a good source of forage.

Bird’s Eyes Gilia (Gilia Tricolor)

A slender annual with flowers to l inch across, pale violet with throats marked by paired purple spots surrounding a yellow or orange tube, fragrant. Found in California on open grassy plains and slopes, below 2,000 ft. Best in full sun, dry soils.