Showing all 13 results

Birdsfoot Trefoil (Lotus corniculatus)

Birdsfoot trefoil is a long lived legume, highly palatable, with a high feed value. It is winter hardy. Widely adapted, easy to maintain and has certain advantages over alfalfa, ladino or red clover. It is more tolerant of infertile and acidic soil, less likely to cause bloat and survives better than most legumes.

Clasping Coneflower (Rudbeckia amplexicaulis)

An annual that produces an abundance of flowers with dark cones and reflexed petals, petals are yellow or yellow with a reddish base. Found across KS to TX, southeast to GA; roadsides, streambanks, fields, and prairies. Prefers full sun, various soils; drought-tolerant; use in mixes, beds, and a good cutflower.

Common Evening Primrose (Oenothera biennis)

A biennial to perennial with tall flowering stalks arise from leafy basal rosettes, yellow flowers open in the evening and are 2-3 inches wide. Naturalized in cooler northern areas of the U.S. Best in full sun, moderate to dry soils; reseeds readily.

Dwarf Evening Primrose (Oenothera Missouriensis)

Synonyms: O. macrocarpa / Missouri Evening Primrose
A tap-rooted perennial with low plants bearing 3-5 inch, yellow flowers. Blooms from mid-June through August, day-blooming. Found across Missouri and Kansas, south to Texas; dry, thin, rocky, exposed calcareous soils on prairies, cliffs, hillsides, slopes. Best in full to partial sun, dry soils, prefers a soil with good drainage; does not tolerate combination of heat and humidity.

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Engelmann Daisy (Engelmannia peristenia)

Synonyms: Cutleaf Daisy
A perennial with leaves that are deeply pinnately lobed; flowers are yellow, daisy-like, to 1 inch across. Found across KS to CO, south to LA and northern Mexico; open, dry, calcareous soil. Best in full sun, dry locations; drought tolerant but supplemental watering may extend the flowering period.

Iceland Poppy (Papaver nudicaule)

Synonyms: Arctic Poppy
A short-lived perennial that produces large, white, orange or yellow flowers on slender stalks, arising from clumps of basal leaves. Blooms in late spring and early summer. Found across arctic regions of North America, south to Colorado. Best in full sun, dry to moist soils; at home in cool climates, does not tolerate combination of heat and humidity, does not transplant well.

Johnny Jump-Up (Viola tricolor)

Synonyms: Johnny Jump up, heartsease, heart’s ease, heart’s delight, tickle-my-fancy, Jack-jump-up-and-kiss-me, come-and-cuddle-me, three faces in a hood, or love-in-idleness. An annual to perennial, produces tiny, Pansy-shaped flowers in purple and gold. Blooms all summer, strongest in spring and fall in hot climates. Best in full to partial sun, prefers moist soils; tolerates full sun best in cool summer areas, will not tolerate combination of heat and humidity; reseeds easily.

Lance-Leaved Coreopsis (Coreopsis lanceolata)

Synonyms: Tickseed
A perennial with showy, bright yellow flowers are 2.5 inches wide; blooms in June through July. Found across Florida to Louisiana, north to Vermont, southern Ontario, Michigan, Illinois and Missouri; dry, sandy or gravelly soils, open prairies and roadsides. Best in full to partial sun, dry to moderately moist soils; fairly drought tolerant and tolerates a wide range of pH and the combination of heat and humidity.

Maximillian Sunflower (Helianthus maximiliani)

A tall perennial sunflower with yellow flowers to 3 inches across, clustered leaves are grayish-green and rough to the touch, often folded and curving downward. Rhizomatous and aggressive. Blooms late August to October. Naturally dominant plant of the prairies, across southern Canada, south to NC, KY and TX. Best in full to partial sun, dry to moist soils; important wildlife plant, deer forage on leaves and birds eat the seeds.

Showy Goldeneye (Heliomeris multiflora)

A long-lived, native perennial with flowers of golden yellow. Often growing in small bushy clumps, this bright sunflower is abundant in summer and fall mountain meadows, frequently brightening many acres; blooms July to September. Its long, narrow leaves are almost an olive drab. Flowers start with a green central disk and tiny green rays, gradually changing to golden disks and golden-yellow rays. Prefers full sun to partial shade in rich to well-drained soils. Common and widely distributed in the Intermountain West.

Sulphur Cosmos (Cosmos sulphureus)

Brightly colored annual that blooms from June to September. Coloring ranges from pale yellow to bright orange; attracts butterflies and bees. Tolerates drought, dry soil, and full sun.