Showing 1–16 of 20 results

Arroyo Lupine (Lupinus succulentus)

Synonyms: Succulent Lupine
An annual that has succulent stems and palmately compound leaves; the bluish to purple flowers have a yellow dot on the banner. Found in western CA, northern Baja peninsula; abundant along roadsides and disturbed areas, establishes quickly in native coastal scrub areas that have burned. Best in full sun, dry soils, drought tolerant; attracts hummingbirds.

Bird’s Eyes Gilia (Gilia Tricolor)

A slender annual with flowers to l inch across, pale violet with throats marked by paired purple spots surrounding a yellow or orange tube, fragrant. Found in California on open grassy plains and slopes, below 2,000 ft. Best in full sun, dry soils.

Blue Vervain (Verbena hastata)

Synonyms: Simpler’s Joy
A clump-forming perennial with stiff, upright stems with square hairy stems; lance-shaped, toothed leaves to 6 inches long; small purple-blue flowers are found on thin spikes, blooming from top to bottom; blooms from July to September. Found across British Columbia to Nova Scotia, south to CA, AZ and FL; wet meadows, wet river bottoms, stream banks, fields and waste areas. Best in full sun, moderate to wet soils; self sows readily.

Blue-Eyed Grass (Sisyrinchium bellum)

Synonyms: California Blue-Eyed Grass
A perennial and a member of the Iris family but resembling a tuft of bluish-green grass; the violet-blue clusters of flowers are borne well above the foliage, 3/4-1 inch wide. Blooms late May through June and again in September. Found in coastal California, open grassy places below 3000 feet elev. Best in full sun, moist soils; plant in groups for best effect and do not allow soil to dry out.

Hoary Vervain (Verbena stricta)

A native perennial that has very erect, leafy stems; produces dense spikes of purple flowers from early July through mid-August. Found across MA and MT, south to northern Mexico; common in pastures, prairies, thickets, roadsides, and waste places. Best in full sun, extremely drought tolerant, prefers dry sandy soils.

Leadplant (Amorpha canescens)

Synonyms: Prairie Shoestrings | Bastard Indigo
A shrub-like perennial with compound leaves with a silvery pubescence, purple flower occur in tight spikes at the ends of the branches in late June-July. Attracts butterflies. Found across Manitoba, south to LA and NM. Prairies, open woods, roadsides. Prefers full sun, mesic to dry soils, adapted to sandy or gravelly soil, can thrive in poor soil and is very drought tolerant, deeply tap-rooted. A nitrogen fixer.

Maiden Pinks (Dianthus deltoides)

A mat-forming perennial, flowers are dark pink, with serrated petals. Blooms from mid-May to July. Best in full sun to light shade, dry to moist soils; prefers gritty, alkaline soil; does not tolerate combination of heat and humidity; excellent for borders, rock gardens, fragrant gardens; can be susceptible to crown rot.

Mountain Lupine (Lupinus alpestris)

A perennial native with blue flowers, tip of keel long and slender. Leaves in distinctive digitate clusters. Blooms June-July. Distributed across OR and CA, east to CO, NM, SD. Dry, rocky places, pine forests to subalpine ridges, generally 5000- 11,000 feet elevation. Best on dry, well-draining soils, full to partial sun, avoid overwatering.

Narrow-Leaf Purple Coneflower (Echinacea angustifolia)

Synonyms: Black Sampson / E. pallida var. angustifolia
A perennial, leaves narrow (linear- lanceolate), flowers are violet, with shorter petals than E. pallida or E. purpurea. Produces a long taproot. Blooms in mid June to late July. Found across MN to Saskatchewan, south to OK, TX; dry upland prairies and barrens. Best in full sun, dry
well-draining soils; perfect for Shortgrass Prairie mixes and xeriscaping.

New England Aster (Symphyotrichum novae-angliae)

A perennial that has leafy stems, leaves hairy; a robust, autumn- blooming aster with thick clusters of pink to dark purple flowers with yellow centers; blooms from mid-August to mid-October. Found across Canada; Vermont to Alabama, west to North Dakota, Wyoming and New Mexico on moist to mesic sandy areas, moist meadows, stream banks, roadsides, open woods and fields. Best in full sun, tolerates partial shade; moist to mesic soils.

Prairie Spiderwort (Tradescantia occidentalis)

An erect, branching perennial with grass-like leaves growing up to 18 inches tall. Purple to pink three-petaled flowers in terminal clusters flower June to July; each flower lasts one day and will close by noon on sunny days. Best in full sun to partial shade with little to moderate moisture; drought tolerant. Its nectar attracts bees and butterflies.