Showing 1–16 of 20 results

Annual Candytuft (Iberis umbellata)

Easy to grow annual that comes in a variety of colors; typically white, purple and pink. Blooming throughout the summer, this plant can grow from 12 to 18 inches tall. Intolerant to moist soils and shade.

 

Dotted Gayfeather (Liatris punctata)

Synonyms: Dense Gayfeather / Blazingstar
A perennial with slender, unbranched plant with tall spike of purple flowers; blooms from July to mid August. Found across Long Island to Michigan, south to Florida and Louisiana; moist areas, meadows, borders of marshes, savannas, damp slopes, wet-mesic prairies, in neutral to slightly acid soil. Best in full to partial sun, moist to mesic soils; tolerates combination of heat and humidity; an excellent cutflower.

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Fireweed (Chamaenerion angustifolium)

A perennial with pink, purple or mauve flowers growing in clusters on the top of the reddish stem; blooming July to September. The fruit are narrow seed pods that split and release numerous tiny white seed heads. It has and unpleasant odor, is slightly hairly. It grows from 3 to 7 feet. Prefers full sun to partial shade, moist to dry, in sandy soil and thrives in burned areas and open wooded areas. Found throughout most of the United States.

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Foxglove (Digitalis sp.)

A biennial with flowers on tall stalks arising from clump of basal leaves, flowers are tubular, to 3 inches long, purple or cream colored with spots inside. Blooms in June. Found on open woods and heaths in mountains. Best in partial sun to shade, moist soil; prefers porous but rich, moist soils; may reflower if cut back; dried leaves are the principal source of the drug, digitalis. Flowers may attract hummingbirds.

Hoary Vervain (Verbena stricta)

A native perennial that has very erect, leafy stems; produces dense spikes of purple flowers from early July through mid-August. Found across MA and MT, south to northern Mexico; common in pastures, prairies, thickets, roadsides, and waste places. Best in full sun, extremely drought tolerant, prefers dry sandy soils.

Johnny Jump-Up (Viola tricolor)

Synonyms: Johnny Jump up, heartsease, heart’s ease, heart’s delight, tickle-my-fancy, Jack-jump-up-and-kiss-me, come-and-cuddle-me, three faces in a hood, or love-in-idleness. An annual to perennial, produces tiny, Pansy-shaped flowers in purple and gold. Blooms all summer, strongest in spring and fall in hot climates. Best in full to partial sun, prefers moist soils; tolerates full sun best in cool summer areas, will not tolerate combination of heat and humidity; reseeds easily.

Lacy Phacelia (Phacelia tanacetifolia)

Lacy phacelia is a native annual wildflower. The height varies from 1 to 3 feet. Lacy phacelia is drought tolerant and grows well given 7 to 18 inches of annual precipitation or irrigation. It prefers well drained sandy and gravelly soils and does not perform well under waterlogged conditions. The plant grows at a variety of elevations from sea level up to 8,000 feet. Lacy phacelia is listed in the top 20 pollen producing flowers for honeybees and is highly attractive to pollinator insects including bumblebees. Bloom season varies with location: April through June in the Mediterranean climate native range in California, in more temperate regions bloom time is extended.

Leadplant (Amorpha canescens)

Synonyms: Prairie Shoestrings | Bastard Indigo
A shrub-like perennial with compound leaves with a silvery pubescence, purple flower occur in tight spikes at the ends of the branches in late June-July. Attracts butterflies. Found across Manitoba, south to LA and NM. Prairies, open woods, roadsides. Prefers full sun, mesic to dry soils, adapted to sandy or gravelly soil, can thrive in poor soil and is very drought tolerant, deeply tap-rooted. A nitrogen fixer.

Mountain Lupine (Lupinus alpestris)

A perennial native with blue flowers, tip of keel long and slender. Leaves in distinctive digitate clusters. Blooms June-July. Distributed across OR and CA, east to CO, NM, SD. Dry, rocky places, pine forests to subalpine ridges, generally 5000- 11,000 feet elevation. Best on dry, well-draining soils, full to partial sun, avoid overwatering.

Narrow-Leaf Purple Coneflower (Echinacea angustifolia)

Synonyms: Black Sampson / E. pallida var. angustifolia
A perennial, leaves narrow (linear- lanceolate), flowers are violet, with shorter petals than E. pallida or E. purpurea. Produces a long taproot. Blooms in mid June to late July. Found across MN to Saskatchewan, south to OK, TX; dry upland prairies and barrens. Best in full sun, dry
well-draining soils; perfect for Shortgrass Prairie mixes and xeriscaping.

New England Aster (Symphyotrichum novae-angliae)

A perennial that has leafy stems, leaves hairy; a robust, autumn- blooming aster with thick clusters of pink to dark purple flowers with yellow centers; blooms from mid-August to mid-October. Found across Canada; Vermont to Alabama, west to North Dakota, Wyoming and New Mexico on moist to mesic sandy areas, moist meadows, stream banks, roadsides, open woods and fields. Best in full sun, tolerates partial shade; moist to mesic soils.

Northern Sweetvetch (Hedysarum boreale)

A perennial with purple bell shaped flowers that hang individually along the stalk, growing 1 to 3 feet. The flowers are hermaphrodite and blooms July to August. The plant prefers full sun in deep well- drained, but moist sandy, loamy, and clay soils. Found across most of the western half of the US.

Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea)

A perennial, produces large, rose-purple flowers, up to 6 inches across, with dome-shaped centers. A bushy plant, blooming from late June through August. Distributed across Ohio to Iowa, south to Louisiana and Georgia; dry, open woods and rocky prairies. Best in full sun to light shade, tolerates various soil types but does best in moderately moist but well-drained soil which is rich in humus; tolerate combination of heat and humidity. A good cutflower, attracts butterflies, seeds attract birds.