Showing 1–16 of 19 results

Bearberry (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi)

Trailing evergreen that is a great option for groundcover; prefers full sun and dry to moist soils. Small white flowers bloom in the spring followed by red berries that may persist until winter. Bearberry attracts bees, butterflies, hummingbirds and is palatable to wildlife.

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Fireweed (Chamaenerion angustifolium)

A perennial with pink, purple or mauve flowers growing in clusters on the top of the reddish stem; blooming July to September. The fruit are narrow seed pods that split and release numerous tiny white seed heads. It has and unpleasant odor, is slightly hairly. It grows from 3 to 7 feet. Prefers full sun to partial shade, moist to dry, in sandy soil and thrives in burned areas and open wooded areas. Found throughout most of the United States.

Golden Currant (Ribes aureum)

Deciduous shrub growing up to 6 feet tall with dark green foliage. Bright yellow flowers bloom from spring to summer, followed by greenish-yellow berries that turn dark red when ripe. Prefers full sun and dry to moist soils. Attracts bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds; palatable to wildlife and birds.

Red Elderberry (Sambucus racemosa)

Native twiggy shrub that grows up to 12 feet tall. Small white flowers bloom in the spring followed by large clusters of small red berries. Red Elderberry attracts bees, hummingbirds, and butterflies. Livestock and game animals may browse.

Rocky Mountain Beeplant (Cleome serrulata)

Rocky Mountain Beeplant has showy bright pink flowers that attract many pollinators, including bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds. Blooming from May to September, this native thrives in full sun and dry soil; drought tolerant.

Showy Goldeneye (Heliomeris multiflora)

A long-lived, native perennial with flowers of golden yellow. Often growing in small bushy clumps, this bright sunflower is abundant in summer and fall mountain meadows, frequently brightening many acres; blooms July to September. Its long, narrow leaves are almost an olive drab. Flowers start with a green central disk and tiny green rays, gradually changing to golden disks and golden-yellow rays. Prefers full sun to partial shade in rich to well-drained soils. Common and widely distributed in the Intermountain West.

Spurred Snapdragon (Antirrhinum cornutum)

Annual with hairy, erect stems that have solitary hairy-lipped flowers that grow in the leaf axils. Flowers are typically white with purple veins; attract butterflies, bees, and hummingbirds. Spurred Snapdragon grows up to 1 foot tall and blooms in the spring. This uncommon species of the New World Snapdragon grows best in partial to full sun and dry soils; drought tolerant.

Swamp Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata)

Clump-forming perennial with milky sap, stems are branching, opposite leaves bend upward on either side of the prominent midrib, flowers are small, fragrant, pink to mauve, and in tight clusters at the stem ends, blooming June to October. Best in full sun, moderate to wet soils.