Showing 33–48 of 115 results

Desert Globemallow (Sphaeralcea ambigua)

A bushy perennial, rhizomatous; stems and leaves covered with grey hairs, leaves resemble small maple leaves; red to orange flowers appear spring and early summer, resemble miniature hollyhock flowers. Blooms late June through August. Native to cold deserts of the Southwest, UT, NV, AZ, CA and Mexico. Requires full sun, prefers well-drained, sandy soils, very drought-tolerant; avoid overwatering as it can become aggressive.

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Desert Marigold (Baileya sp.)

Synonyms: Wild Marigold
An annual or perennial; daisy-like flowers are single and yellow, 1-2 inches across; blooms for most of the season. poisonous to livestock (sheep, not cows). Found across UT to southern CA, TX and northern Mexico. Found in native low deserts such as the eastern Mojave, sandy or rocky soils, plains and mesas. Very drought-tolerant. Grows best in full sun and well-drained soils outside of desert areas, does not tolerate combination of heat and humidity. Grow as an annual outside of desert areas.

Dotted Gayfeather (Liatris punctata)

Synonyms: Dense Gayfeather / Blazingstar
A perennial with slender, unbranched plant with tall spike of purple flowers; blooms from July to mid August. Found across Long Island to Michigan, south to Florida and Louisiana; moist areas, meadows, borders of marshes, savannas, damp slopes, wet-mesic prairies, in neutral to slightly acid soil. Best in full to partial sun, moist to mesic soils; tolerates combination of heat and humidity; an excellent cutflower.

Dwarf Columbine (Aquilegia flabellata)

Synonyms: European Crowfoot |
Granny’s Bonnet
A perennial, all leaves basal; drooping bell-shaped flowers with strongly hooked spurs, in white, red, violet or blue. Blooms from May to mid-June. Found in mountain pastures, rocky places, shady slopes and woods. Best in full sun to shady conditions, prefers sandy, well-drained soils, moderate water; attracts hummingbirds.

Dwarf Evening Primrose (Oenothera Missouriensis)

Synonyms: O. macrocarpa / Missouri Evening Primrose
A tap-rooted perennial with low plants bearing 3-5 inch, yellow flowers. Blooms from mid-June through August, day-blooming. Found across Missouri and Kansas, south to Texas; dry, thin, rocky, exposed calcareous soils on prairies, cliffs, hillsides, slopes. Best in full to partial sun, dry soils, prefers a soil with good drainage; does not tolerate combination of heat and humidity.

Eaton’s Penstemon/Firecracker Penstemon (Penstemon eatonii)

Synonyms: Firecracker Penstemon
A short to long-lived, perennial withseveral red flowers growing in stalks or clusters. Each flower has the typical 5-lobed corolla and blooms between May to July. Growing upwards of 2 feet tall. It prefers well-drained soils and is cold and drought tolerant. Mainly planted for its beauty and erosion control. Found on dry slopes in the southwest from Colorado to California.

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Engelmann Daisy (Engelmannia peristenia)

Synonyms: Cutleaf Daisy
A perennial with leaves that are deeply pinnately lobed; flowers are yellow, daisy-like, to 1 inch across. Found across KS to CO, south to LA and northern Mexico; open, dry, calcareous soil. Best in full sun, dry locations; drought tolerant but supplemental watering may extend the flowering period.

Farewell-to-Spring (Clarkia amoena)

These showy, pink, cup-shaped flowers thrive in full sun to part shade and dry soil. They are an excellent source of nectar and can attract butterflies and bees. Blooms throughout the summer.

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Fireweed (Chamaenerion angustifolium)

A perennial with pink, purple or mauve flowers growing in clusters on the top of the reddish stem; blooming July to September. The fruit are narrow seed pods that split and release numerous tiny white seed heads. It has and unpleasant odor, is slightly hairly. It grows from 3 to 7 feet. Prefers full sun to partial shade, moist to dry, in sandy soil and thrives in burned areas and open wooded areas. Found throughout most of the United States.

Five-Spot (Nemophila maculata)

An annual with cup-shaped, white blossoms, 1-2 inches across with light purple veins and a purple spot at the edge of each petal lobe. Found in California on mesic to moist slopes and flats, below 7,500 ft. elev., west of the Sierra Nevadas. Best in partial sun to shade, mesic to moist soils; excellent for shady borders.

Fleabane Daisy (Erigeron annuus)

Synonyms: Aspen Daisy
A perennial, 8-24 inches tall; produces masses of aster-like, lavender flowers with yellow centers. Blooms mid-June to mid-July. Found across Alberta and British Columbia, south to Montana, New Mexico, and Arizona; open, wooded areas. Best in full to partial sun, dry to moist soils, prefers well-drained soil that is not too rich; attracts butterflies.

Forget-Me-Not (Myosotis scorpioides)

An annual or biennial, depending on climate produces masses of miniature, sky-blue blossoms with white, yellow or pink centers. Blooms from mid-April to June. Found on rocky places, mountain pastures, damp meadows, woods. Naturalized in the U.S. in moist, shaded places. Best in partial sun to shade, moist soils; perfect for borders, rock gardens, and for dainty bouquets.

Four O’Clocks (Mirabilis jalapa)

Synonyms: Marvel-of-Peru | Beauty-of-the-night
A tender perennial that produces handsome, trumpet-shaped flowers in shades of red, pink, yellow and white, often striped or mottled. Flowers open in late afternoon. Blooms late summer through autumn. Found in tropical America, occasionally escaping from cultivation and establishing in waste places and roadsides. Best in full sun, dry to moist soils; attracts birds and butterflies.

Out Of Stock

Foxglove (Digitalis sp.)

A biennial with flowers on tall stalks arising from clump of basal leaves, flowers are tubular, to 3 inches long, purple or cream colored with spots inside. Blooms in June. Found on open woods and heaths in mountains. Best in partial sun to shade, moist soil; prefers porous but rich, moist soils; may reflower if cut back; dried leaves are the principal source of the drug, digitalis. Flowers may attract hummingbirds.