Arkansas Valley Seed supplies quality Shrubs and Trees for reclamation projects, forest fire recovery, and landscaping. Our selection includes over 50 different varieties including Black Sagebrush, Rocky Mountain Juniper, Red Elderberry, Douglas Fir, and more. From the Intermountain West of the Rocky Mountains to California and throughout other regions of the United States, Arkansas Valley Seed has your shrub and tree needs covered.

Showing 1–16 of 62 results

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Antelope Bitterbrush

A long-lived perennial, evergreen growing to an average of 9 feet. Stems are short and spear shaped, buds are small and scaly. It has dark green leaves and flowers that are solitary and funnel shaped blooming in May and June. Seeds mature July to August. It is mostly palatable to wildlife in the winter months and is recommended distributed sites in the Intermountain West. Has long taproots that grow well in coarse textured, deep, well-drained soils. Found in the intermountain west of the Rocky Mountains to California and in northern Arizona and New Mexico.

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Apache Plume

An evergreen shrub growing up to 6 feet high. It is more shrub- like appearance, having numerous branches at the base. Its small grayish, downy leaves are innately divided into linear divisions, attached alternately on slender stems, and curved slightly downward. Fruit heads are silvery puffs and the plumes are white or pinkish. A white rose like flower with yellow centers blooms April through June. It prefers gravelly soils and is found on rocky slopes and hillsides. It has poor palatability that is sometime grazed when other forages are limited. Found throughout the Southwest in deserts.

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Basin Big Sagebrush

A perennial, evergreen shrub averaging 4 feet high but can grow as high as 15 feet. The tall rounded shrubs with short branched, woody trunks. Numerous yellow tubular flowers cover the shrub blooming July to September. Prefers moderately shallow to deep, well drained, sandy to silt loam soils of neutral to slightly alkaline reaction and is drought tolerant. It supplies better cover for livestock and wildlife than its palatability. Basin Big sagebrush is distributed throughout the western United States.

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Bearberry

Synonym: Kinnikinnick
A long-lived evergreen, dense shrub growing between 6 to 12” high. Flower growth process begins as small pinkish urns that mature into red berries. The flower blooms in the spring. Prefers growing in the open on sand dunes, but will grow under the partial shade of forest. Grow well in coarse will drained sandy and acidic soils in full sun. It is cold tolerant and used for reclamation and as a soil stabilizer. It is popular ground cover used in many landscapes due to its thick vegetative mat. Located in all upper states of the United States and sometimes as south as New Mexico and Arizona.

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Birch-Leaf Mountain Mahogany

A shrub or small deciduous tree growing to 12 feet tall. Severe drought, changes of climate, and the poor soil may cause the growth to be
stunted. The bark is grayish in color, and can be scaly, with twigs that are spur like and a bright reddish brown. The single small dry fruits have spiral, somewhat silky plumes 1-_ ” to 2” long, with feathery tails on the end. There are clusters of 2-3 apetalus flowers, each have five broad-triangular sepals and many stamens, blooming from March to June. It is fire resistiant sprouting new growth quickly from its roots. Most common in the California Chaparral Mountains and dry, rocky slopes from South Dakota to Mexico.

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Black Grasewood

A deciduous, native, monoecious shrub, growing 2 to 8 feet tall. It has moderate to dense vegetation with spiny appearance and the bark is yellowishgray to light brown with deep grooves. Flowers are green with hint of red; the males are cone-like with terminal spikes and the females are wing-like, from June to August. The fruit is tan or reddish is color with a small brown seed in the center. Th e hardy shrub is common in saline or alkaline, deep clay, silty clay, sandy clay, or loam soils. Located in the Northern parts of the Rocky Mountain region.

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Black Greasewood

A deciduous, native, monoecious shrub, growing 2 to 8 feet tall. It has moderate to dense vegetation with spiny appearance and the bark is yellowishgray to light brown with deep grooves. Flowers are green with hint of red; the males are cone-like with terminal spikes and the females are wing-like, from June to August. The fruit is tan or reddish is color with a small brown seed in the center. Th e hardy shrub is common in saline or alkaline, deep clay, silty clay, sandy clay, or loam soils. Located in the Northern parts of the Rocky Mountain region.

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Black Sagebrush

A evergreen, native shrub growing 10 to 18” tall. The trunk bark is a dark reddish-brown to black and the twigs are short, rigid, light to dark reddish-brown, and becoming black with age. Flowers are oblong, and brownish to tan, blooming August to September. Seeds are flat and brown in color. The aromatic shrub preferring well drained clayey to gravelly soils that are dry and shallow. It is good forage for livestock in the winter season. Found in the foothills and desert mountain ranges of Utah and Nevada.

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Blackbrush

A evergreen, native, cool season shrub growing 3 to 15 feet. A soft wood shrub with gray to ashy bark that can appear black with age or when wet. Thorny branches produce many greenishyellow to purple flowers from March to May. Seed are dry, smooth achenes, somewhat flat, with a long, bent and twisted, thread-like stalks. It resprouts vigorously from seeds when excessive moisture is available however it most common in dry and well-drained, sandy, gravelly, and rocky soils. Established in a small Southwest region of the United States.

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Blue Palo Verde

A evergreen tree growing to an average of 20 feet. It has spiny greenish trunk and branches. It blossoms thousands of five-petaled yellow dull flowers during a short growing season starting in early spring. Blue Palo Verde seeds are slightly larger and flatter, with thicker, harder shells than the other species. It grows faster and dies sooner than other species and used more as shelter than as a forage to livestock and wildlife. Found mainly in the lower half of New Mexico, Arizona and the southern tip of California.

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Brittlebrush

A short-lived evergreen, deciduous leafy bush, growing 2 to 5 feet tall and wide. The herbaceous bush has leaves that are triangular greenish-gray to silvery and produce a substance, toxic to other plants in the proximity. Flowers are yellow and daisy like blooming mostly from March to June. The fragrant woody bush prefers dry gravelly slopes to open sandy washes. It is a poor forage that reproduces easily from seeds and cuttings. Occurs in the desert areas of the Southwestern United States.

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Broom Snakeweed

A short-lived, perennial, native, warm season shrub that grows from 8 to 28” tall. The clusters of small golden-yellow flowers bloom August to October, which may remain well into the fall. The seed is brown, hairy and with chaffy scales. Beacuse it contains saponin, it is poisonous to all livestock except goats. Used for reclamation and mines as it absorbs selenium. Prefers clay loams of broad alluvial slopes, and shallow, rocky, or sandy soil and does poor saline or alkaline soils. It is drought tolerant and reproduces from seeds. Found west of the Mississippi river and almost to the Pacific coast.

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Castle Valley Clover

A woody, native shrub growing 6 to 12” tall. It has two flowers, one is dark in color and glomerules arranged in panicles, the other is borne in axillary clusters, both blooming in April and May. Leaves are a light to grey green in color and its fruits are small. Often found in clay or soils, and moderate to high alkaline soils. It grows on a variably of saline soils. It can be suppressed by perennial grasses or annual weeds. Provides a palatable forage for livestock and wildlife year round. Native to eastern Utah, southwest Colorado, and northern New Mexico.

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Chokecherry

A perennial, native, deciduous, shrub or small tree rarely reaches a height of over 30 feet. The bark is smooth and grayish brown with many white flowers having elongated raceme. The fruit is deep red to dark red purple. Chokecherry is nutritious throughout the growing season; however, new leaves and growth can be poisonous during some growing season to livestock and humans. It spread by rhizomes making it a great for erosion control. Common throughout the central and northern states from the Pacific to the Atlantic oceans.

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Common Snowberry

A perennial, deciduous, nativeshrub or small tree that grows between 2 to 5 feet. The large, toothed leaves have five to seven leaflets and irregularly lobed. It has many small, white flowers with an unpleasant odor blooming May to July. The fruit is white with berry like drupes that turn black when ripe. Grows well in sun or shade and found along stream banks, in swampy thickets, moist clearings and open forests at sea level to middle elevations. It tolerates allsoil types but grows best in heavy clay, well drained soils and either in sun or shade. Common among all the Northern United States.

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Creeping Oregon Grape

A evergreen under shrub growing 1 to 3 feet tall. Leaves are dull green with spin edges turning deep red in the fall. The bright yellow flowers bloom in April and May. Bluish berries are similar to other fleshy varieties of grapes. Grows in all types of soil and pH balance and prefers sun or shade with moist or dry soil. It has poor palatability for livestock but good for wildlife. Commonly used by landscapers. Found east of the Rocky Mountains thru the Cascade Mountains and as far south as New Mexico.