Showing 113–128 of 237 results

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Intermediate Ryegrass

A short-lived perennial, cool season, introduced bunchgrass. It is the result of a cross between annual and perennial ryegrass. It has a finer leaf texture, very heat tolerant, and is less winter hardy but higher yielding than perennial ryegrass. Intermediate Ryegrass is used for grazing, or as a great rotation crop, hay production in northern Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin.
Varieties:
Bison

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Intermediate Wheatgrass

A long-lived perennial, cool season, introduced grass growing 36 to 48” tall. It has short rhizomes and a deep feeding root system, preferring well drained loamy to clayey textured soils. Intermediate Wheatgrass will tolerate slightly acidic to mildly saline conditions, can withstand moderate periodic flooding in the spring, and is very tolerant of fire. It has good palatability to livestock and wildlife and adapts well to the stabilization of disturbed soils.
Varieties:
Oahe

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Kentucky Bluegrass

A perennial, cool-season, introduced sod-forming grass 18 to 24” tall. It is a darker green foliage, longer leaves, and pubescence at the bases of the leaves. In the west, it is very abundant and frequently used for hay and forage for sheep and cattle. In the east, it is planted as a pasture grass, but not usually used for hay.
Varieties:
Troy | Ginger. Also hundreds of commercially available turf-type varieties, please see Turf Species Section.

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Kleingrass

A perennial, warm season, introduced bunchgrass grows 36 to 48” tall at maturity. Adapted to a wide range of heavy soils and dry conditions. Performs well on loamy to clayey soils and is salt tolerant. Considerable drought tolerance but not cold tolerant. Common in southern New Mexico, and Oklahoma, Texas, and Arizona.

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Lehmanns Lovegrass

A perennial, warm season, introduced sod forming grass that grows 12 to 24” tall. Adapted to a wide variety of sites, and is drought tolerant. It has good palatability for livestock and the seed passes unharmed through the animal assisting with reseeding. Can persist for several years in the soil until soil has adequate moisture for growth. Found across southwest United States.

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Letterman Needlegrass

A perennial, cool season, native bunchgrass with mostly glabrous stems that are 6 to 24” tall. Provides valuable forage for many species of wildlife and domestic livestock, and excellent reclamation grass for upper elevation regions. Found across the Western United States.

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Little Bluestem

A slow growing perennial, warm season, native bunchgrass reaching a height from 18” in dry areas to 3 to 5 feet in deep in fertile soils. It displays coarse stems and basal leaves are greenish-blue to purplish in color, and grows on a wide variety of soils, but is very well adapted to well- drained, medium to dry, infertile high salinity soils. Resistant to trampling and fair forage it is very palatable for livestock, deer, and elk and suitable for hay. Distributed throughout the United States.
Varieties:
Aldous | Blaze| Camper| Cimmaron| Pastura

Low Grow Mix

A mixture of perennial, cool season, drought tolerant, grasses suitable for areas where mowing is difficult or not desirable. It grows an average of 8-12 inches a year with normal rain fall in the Intermountain region and the Desert Southwest, grows up to 10,000 ft. This mix is a great soil stabilizer and it is very compatible with our wildflower mixes. For new seeding, broadcast at 20-25Lbs./acre or drilled at 15-20Lbs. /acre. For over-seeding, broadcast at 10-15Lbs./acre or drilled at 5-10Lbs./acre.

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Mammoth Wildrye

A perennial, cool season, native sod forming grass that grows 24 to 48” tall. Used for stabilizing inland sand dunes, mine tailings and permanent cover on shallow to deep sands. Moderately tolerant of saline and saline sodic soils. It has poor palatability due to its course leaves, but it has been grazed in drought situations. Adapted to the Pacific Northwest it is and in Intermountain region.
Varieties:
Volga

Mat Saltbush (Atriplex corrugata)

Low-growing native shrub with a woody base and silvery-green leaves. Yellow flowers bloom in the spring. Palatable to livestock and wildlife.

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Meadow Barley

A short-lived perennial, cool season, native bunchgrass that grows 12 to 14” tall. Establishes rapidly and is a good cover crop in orchards and vineyards. Tolerates drought as well as infertile, alkaline, compacted soil. Meadow Barley is especially useful in reclamation and erosion control. Common in the Western States and some of the North Eastern States.

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Meadow Brome

A long-lived perennial, cool season, introduced grass that spreads by short rhizomes. Reaching 2 to 6 feet in height when irrigated. Its primary use is for rotational forage production and is highly palatable to all classes of livestock and wildlife. Meadow Brome is very winter hardy. It performs best on fertile, moderately deep to deep, well-drained soils. Used in cool moist climates of across the Northern United States.
Varieties:
Fleet | Montana PVP | Paddock | Regar

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Meadow Fescue

A short-lived perennial, cool season, introduced bunchgrass that grows 6 to 12” tall. It is slow to establish but is very palatable and highly productive. Commonly found on cool and moist sites across the Pacific Northwest and Northern US.

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Meadow Sedge

Synonyms: Silver Sedge
A native perennial plant with short rhizomes that grows 8 to 30” tall. Found in openings of woodlands, swamps, weedy meadows, and abandoned fields. Distributed across the western and northeast US.

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Merten’s Rush

A perennial herb with short, stout rhizomes that grows up 4 to 16” tall. Found in wet meadows, along streams and marshes throughout the Intermountain and Pacific Northwest.